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Re: Antiques Roadshow/Cockpit Discussion

Posted: Sun Jan 17, 2010 4:54 pm
by KW Mitchell
Mike Bull wrote:----- on top of which sits the G meter, ---------
Mike - can I ask, is that a peak-reading G meter, and, is there any record of it being logged after runs?

I bet it was pretty high on the final run -----------!

Keith

Re: Antiques Roadshow/Cockpit Discussion

Posted: Sun Jan 17, 2010 7:12 pm
by f1steveuk
The '55 pictures (fixed forward part of the canopy so defo' 55) shows that there were no vinyl "curtains" along the frame at that time, and I've always wondered why they bothered with these anyway?

Leo was quite fastidious with his logs, yet I have never seen ANY "G" recordings logged. Is there a clue as to which direction G was being recorded (vertical, forward/aft, e.g for the water brake) and is the sensor in built, or mounted elsewhere? The most telling thing from those shots is the '55 K7 had a different steering wheel to 66/67, which may have something to do with a change of steering box (and therefore ratio) that Leo's notes suggest took place because of the higher expected average speeds.

Image

1959, different boss nut but there is the Blue Bird plaque and the hinged St Christopher.

Re: Antiques Roadshow/Cockpit Discussion

Posted: Sun Jan 17, 2010 7:40 pm
by CHWk7
Mike, Have you got this picture, might be helpful to you!

Chris.
ba98.jpg

Re: Antiques Roadshow/Cockpit Discussion

Posted: Sun Jan 17, 2010 8:14 pm
by f1steveuk
Mike Bull wrote:Re. the steering, from memory I believe the first system installed failed immediately and was replaced? Can't recall which book that's in, but I know it's there somewhere.
Do you mean 55 or 66?? 55 was a change in ratio, I think, but not a failure.

Re: Antiques Roadshow/Cockpit Discussion

Posted: Sun Jan 17, 2010 9:05 pm
by Renegadenemo
I'm sure I read somewhere that the steering failed whilst under test immediately after it was installed and had to be beefed up. This was certainly supported by the various strengtheners lashed in to where the bearings carried the steering shaft but how true it is I wouldn't know.

Re: Antiques Roadshow/Cockpit Discussion

Posted: Sun Jan 17, 2010 9:17 pm
by f1steveuk
Now I'm in the UK, I don't have access to any of the paperwork I'd normally go to, so this id from memory, so certain disclaimers apply!!!

Something didn't work too well during construction, and the linkage was altered, I'm sure Leo's notes said "we had to alter the path" or something like that. The steering ratio was changed during the Ulswater test runs, and then remained pretty constant, although at sometime part of the rudder was cut off to reduce the size. In '59 a new smaller, thinner rudder was fitted, and the ratios changed slightly. For '66/67 the rudder was ground down to make it thinner still, and, if I recall correctly, no further ratio adjustment was possible, so a new box was fitted, which required a different boss and nut. I will admit, I have slept since I read leo's notes last!

Re: Antiques Roadshow/Cockpit Discussion

Posted: Sun Jan 17, 2010 9:32 pm
by rob565uk
According to Donald's own book "Into the Water Barrier", it looks like the original steering system failed during final mechanical testing of K7 in late 1954/early 1955, immediately prior to testing on Ullswater in early 1955. To quote:

"There was further delay with the completion of the slipway at Glenridding, and trouble with the steering control gear. When it was tested to a factor of three - by being subjected to a load three times greater than it was calculated to meet in operation - the gear broke down. This was a severe setback. The entire engine installation, the intake ducting, the fuel tank, the floats, rear spar, all the linkage and the supporting brackets had to be stripped out of the boat, and the steering gear re-designed and built again. After a month's work Bloctube Controls Ltd. produced a strong, beautifully light system tested to a factor of 10 - a first-class job."

Re: Antiques Roadshow/Cockpit Discussion

Posted: Sun Jan 17, 2010 9:46 pm
by f1steveuk
Teach me to use my brain! I knew it was something to do with the course the linkage took, rather than the original 'box. I'm pretty certain the steering was under suspicion during the north American attempts, as Donald hated the handling, to the point where they surveyed the hull, DC fearing the airbourne shinanigans had twisted the frame.

Regardless of which box was fitted, and when, if they were worm and peg, changing the ratio wouldn't have been the work of ten minutes! How far off thread is this??!!

Re: Antiques Roadshow/Cockpit Discussion

Posted: Sun Jan 17, 2010 10:16 pm
by lsrdatabase
f1steveuk wrote:Now I'm in the UK, I don't have access to any of the paperwork I'd normally go to, so this id from memory, so certain disclaimers apply!!!

Something didn't work too well during construction, and the linkage was altered, I'm sure Leo's notes said "we had to alter the path" or something like that. The steering ratio was changed during the Ulswater test runs, and then remained pretty constant, although at sometime part of the rudder was cut off to reduce the size. In '59 a new smaller, thinner rudder was fitted, and the ratios changed slightly. For '66/67 the rudder was ground down to make it thinner still, and, if I recall correctly, no further ratio adjustment was possible, so a new box was fitted, which required a different boss and nut. I will admit, I have slept since I read leo's notes last!
Hi Steve,

A quick quote from 'Rainbow', no real info but it does confirm the trouble with the early Steering.

"More problems meant more delays at Glenridding, and trouble with the steering control gear, which failed during testing. This meant stripping out most of the internal fittings and controls. The complete engine, intake ducting, fuel tank, floats, rear spar, and all linkage and support brackets, had to be removed. The steering gear was redesigned and rebuilt. A month later, Bloctube Controls Ltd. had produced a strong, yet light system. In Donald’s words, “A first class job”.

Regards, Fred

"I'm just that bloke, that won't go away!"

Re: Antiques Roadshow/Cockpit Discussion

Posted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 1:33 am
by Renegadenemo
Interesting discussion regarding the steering gear. If I had to put money on it I'd say they lashed the steering rod bearings into the outriggers - it seems no provision was designed into the hull for the systems except for the rudder mounts so the whole lot had to be designed in retrospectively - whereupon the outriggers deflected under the steering loads and someone had to think again. Sure enough, you'd have to gut the hull to get at the offending parts and what it looks like they did was rivet in plates to shore up the bearings.

Here's the bearing at F-11 mounted to a 2mm thick plate from which we've punched a rivet mandrel to let the water out of the frame tube. You can see the steering shaft passing through the bearing to the upper right of the spurting water. This was in 2006 and the frame was not only still full but pressurised too with trapped 1954 air. The plate, like the others along the length of the steering linkage, proved to be a retro-fitted item and, like much of K7, a bit of a bodge.