Pic of the Day

Post Reply
User avatar
Renegadenemo
Posts: 4937
Joined: Mon Dec 01, 2008 12:29 pm
Location: N E England
Contact:

Re: Pic of the Day

Post by Renegadenemo » Thu Aug 31, 2017 11:00 am

Quick question about the adding of material to the floors. If they overlapped one way do the panels butt up in the other direction or do you have to joggle the bit your adding?
It's one continuous floor 18' long so it has to be welded back together. We cut it at that position because everything forward of the cut was damaged and everything aft nice and flat. That left us a much smaller piece to repair but once mended the shrinkage left us a gap to deal with. as it has to be heat treated we didn't want a discontinuity in the material type running right across it so we harvested a slither from the outer edge of the joggle where the floors meet longitudinally leaving all the rivet holes so we can join the floor lengthwise and the area we stole from not only doesn't affect the joint in any way but it also cannot be seen. The harvested piece was the fusion welded without filler to the aft edge of the forward floor section leaving it 1/32nd long to allow for weld shrinkage and when all the repairs are made it will likewise be fused to the aft piece of floor making it once more a continuous sheet of the same material (7068 aluminium)
I'm only a plumber from Cannock...

"As to reward, my profession is its own reward;" Sherlock Holmes.

'Sometimes you gotta be an S.O.B if you wanna make a dream reality' Mark Knopfler

mark-f

Re: Pic of the Day

Post by mark-f » Fri Sep 01, 2017 3:23 pm

"Developed in the mid 1990’s, 7068 alloy was designed as a higher strength alternative to 7075 for ordnance applications".

https://www.smithmetal.com/7068.htm

User avatar
Renegadenemo
Posts: 4937
Joined: Mon Dec 01, 2008 12:29 pm
Location: N E England
Contact:

Re: Pic of the Day

Post by Renegadenemo » Sat Sep 02, 2017 7:44 pm

"Developed in the mid 1990’s, 7068 alloy was designed as a higher strength alternative to 7075 for ordnance applications".
And for the V-bombers in the 50s...
I'm only a plumber from Cannock...

"As to reward, my profession is its own reward;" Sherlock Holmes.

'Sometimes you gotta be an S.O.B if you wanna make a dream reality' Mark Knopfler

conistoncollie
Posts: 98
Joined: Fri Mar 30, 2012 12:17 pm
Location: Worcestershire

Re: Pic of the Day

Post by conistoncollie » Sun Sep 03, 2017 11:16 am

Was that supplied by Birmetals / Birmalloy?

User avatar
Renegadenemo
Posts: 4937
Joined: Mon Dec 01, 2008 12:29 pm
Location: N E England
Contact:

Re: Pic of the Day

Post by Renegadenemo » Sun Sep 03, 2017 12:20 pm

Was that supplied by Birmetals / Birmalloy?
No way to be sure, but I suspect not. The Birmetals material seems to be pretty ordinary marine grade, 5xxx material but the main outer floor is very exotic. It's obviously come on a roll because it's 18ft long but so narrow that they've had to use two lengths of it joined down the centreline. It'll be something made especially for the Vulcan or Victor. It's had to be annealed and furnace cooled to get it soft enough to do anything with it and it's a nightmare to weld - another of those alloys that 'cannot be welded' and now we have to make as fixture for it so it can be heated and quenched to restore its original properties but without it deviating to the point where it won't fit back on the boat.
I'm only a plumber from Cannock...

"As to reward, my profession is its own reward;" Sherlock Holmes.

'Sometimes you gotta be an S.O.B if you wanna make a dream reality' Mark Knopfler

User avatar
Renegadenemo
Posts: 4937
Joined: Mon Dec 01, 2008 12:29 pm
Location: N E England
Contact:

Re: Pic of the Day

Post by Renegadenemo » Mon Sep 04, 2017 1:15 am

To be pedantic for a minute (Me? No, never!) the floor must be nearer 20 feet long, because it starts at F19 like the cradle, which itself is 19 feet long and still doesn't reach all the way to the back of the boat.
And so one personal attribute complements another. Me, being so forgetful, had to remind myself that it measured about 18' before we thought about sticking the broken part from the front back on so it's going to be nearer 21' when complete.
I'm only a plumber from Cannock...

"As to reward, my profession is its own reward;" Sherlock Holmes.

'Sometimes you gotta be an S.O.B if you wanna make a dream reality' Mark Knopfler

User avatar
thunderer
Posts: 130
Joined: Fri Jun 19, 2009 12:18 am
Location: London UK
Contact:

Re: Pic of the Day

Post by thunderer » Mon Sep 25, 2017 10:54 am

I am in no way trying to be pedantic (especially when favours are involved) but.............

Am I the only one to notice that the new throttle return spring is wound the opposite way to the original in todays POTD (25/9/17) ??
(I would link the image, but do not want to fall foul of forum C.O.C/website C.O.P, nor fall foul of "hot-linking" issues)

The original [throttle return] spring is wound such that it has a "top left to bottom right" winding, wheras the replacement [throttle return] spring has a "top right to bottom left" winding..

I would term them left and right handed if I could remember which is which, though after an 18 hour session installing two computer OS's and all the programs for each computer from scratch back-to-back, my brain is, understandably, a tad fried.


(as an aside, I would have logged on much earlier but for losing my login details, until yesterday!)
Just cos my username is Thunderer, doesn't necessarily mean I SHOUT !!
"A vehicle is designed to be used, restored or otherwise" A personal response on the question "you have just restored it, why use it?"

User avatar
LeicesterK7Fan
Posts: 7
Joined: Thu Nov 03, 2011 6:07 pm
Location: Lutterworth

Re: Pic of the Day

Post by LeicesterK7Fan » Mon Sep 25, 2017 12:42 pm

thunderer wrote:
Mon Sep 25, 2017 10:54 am
I am in no way trying to be pedantic (especially when favours are involved) but.............

Am I the only one to notice that the new throttle return spring is wound the opposite way to the original in todays POTD (25/9/17) ??
(I would link the image, but do not want to fall foul of forum C.O.C/website C.O.P, nor fall foul of "hot-linking" issues)

The original [throttle return] spring is wound such that it has a "top left to bottom right" winding, wheras the replacement [throttle return] spring has a "top right to bottom left" winding..

I would term them left and right handed if I could remember which is which, though after an 18 hour session installing two computer OS's and all the programs for each computer from scratch back-to-back, my brain is, understandably, a tad fried.


(as an aside, I would have logged on much earlier but for losing my login details, until yesterday!)
I agree the original is an anti-clockwise helix and the new one a clockwise helix.
At speed on Coniston.

User avatar
Renegadenemo
Posts: 4937
Joined: Mon Dec 01, 2008 12:29 pm
Location: N E England
Contact:

Re: Pic of the Day

Post by Renegadenemo » Mon Sep 25, 2017 12:53 pm

We wanted a slightly higher spring rate and the closed and ground ends. We got those but the tooling made our free spring the other way around. So long as the throttle closes when it's supposed to we don't give a fling which way our helix goes! :lol:
I'm only a plumber from Cannock...

"As to reward, my profession is its own reward;" Sherlock Holmes.

'Sometimes you gotta be an S.O.B if you wanna make a dream reality' Mark Knopfler

User avatar
thunderer
Posts: 130
Joined: Fri Jun 19, 2009 12:18 am
Location: London UK
Contact:

Re: Pic of the Day

Post by thunderer » Mon Sep 25, 2017 1:03 pm

Renegadenemo wrote:
Mon Sep 25, 2017 12:53 pm
We wanted a slightly higher spring rate and the closed and ground ends. We got those but the tooling made our free spring the other way around. So long as the throttle closes when it's supposed to we don't give a fling which way our helix goes! :lol:
Well in that case, fair enough!

If a sound engineering reason is behind the difference in helix direction and being that it is one that is safety related, who can argue?
Just cos my username is Thunderer, doesn't necessarily mean I SHOUT !!
"A vehicle is designed to be used, restored or otherwise" A personal response on the question "you have just restored it, why use it?"

Post Reply