Quicksilver

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ace_chris
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Re: Quicksilver

Post by ace_chris » Mon Jan 18, 2010 9:16 pm

Ok, First of all apologies for the huge url. Nigel, if you are aware of any dead pages/links that are still kicking about on the web this should help you remove them. Hope it helps. With kind regards, Chris

https://www.google.com/accounts/Service ... oval&hl=en

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Piston Broke
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Re: Quicksilver

Post by Piston Broke » Mon Jan 18, 2010 9:19 pm

Kieth that link forwards to http://quicksilver-wsr.com/ and not http://www.quicksilver-wsr.com/

Hope this helps Nigel getting all the addresses pointing to the the correct pages I know what a headache it can be. I had similar problems when we changed servers
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Renegadenemo
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Re: Quicksilver

Post by Renegadenemo » Mon Jan 18, 2010 9:23 pm

Where's our Alain when we need him? Come on, Al, you normally sort stuff like this in your sleep...
I'm only a plumber from Cannock...

"As to reward, my profession is its own reward;" Sherlock Holmes.

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Piston Broke
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Re: Quicksilver

Post by Piston Broke » Mon Jan 18, 2010 9:35 pm

Renegadenemo wrote:Where's our Alain when we need him? Come on, Al, you normally sort stuff like this in your sleep...
I'm in the post above you with the answer

I have also mailed nigel with some suggestions
If it can't be fixed with duck tape it can't be fixed
There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness"
Facebook is to socialising is what masturbation is to sex

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Renegadenemo
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Re: Quicksilver

Post by Renegadenemo » Mon Jan 18, 2010 9:38 pm

Ha! we must've posted at the same time - yours wasn't there when I posted.
I'm only a plumber from Cannock...

"As to reward, my profession is its own reward;" Sherlock Holmes.

'Sometimes you gotta be an S.O.B if you wanna make a dream reality' Mark Knopfler

quicksilver-wsr
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Re: Quicksilver

Post by quicksilver-wsr » Mon Jan 18, 2010 11:12 pm

Thanks for all the advice, guys. I suggest that you all stick to directly accessing the Quicksilver website, as there's no point in using dud links that have passed their sell-by date.

I'll pass all your info to Richard Horsfall, who has been doing some good work lately to improve our website. When he gets a spare moment - he's a busy chap - he'll hopefully be able to sort this glitch once and for all.

Mr Mitchell: the news story on 24 December is the most recent one we've published. You are not missing anything.

All the best to all.

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Re: Quicksilver

Post by quicksilver-wsr » Tue Jan 19, 2010 7:21 pm

Reference your point, Mr. Mitchell, about Quicksilver appearing to have a rather narrow "stability triangle" - I can only agree. However, a lot of careful thought was put into it and we decided to narrow-down the boat a little at the front when we finally froze the overall boat design (geometry) in December 2007.

The wider apart the sponsons are, the beefier - and therefore heavier - the sponson-arms need to be to prevent flexing. We looked carefully at what the tightest reasonable turning radius of a boat like this would need to be, and what kind of lateral g-loads (attributable to turning) were acceptable, and came to the conclusion that we could narrow the overall width of the boat down, as measured across the sponsons. The ultimate decision on this came from our marine architect, Lorne Campbell, who was also the arbiter of the boat's overall length (greater length generally representing greater stability in pitch).

Turning to the matter of the "fly-by-wire" control method; this is, indeed, what we have on Quicksilver. However, we prefer not to use the term "fly-by-wire", as the word "fly" has unwelcome connotations for a boat! Furthermore, there is another problem with the term, and that is that FBW technology has advanced to such a degree that intrinsically unstable aircraft can be made stable by its (FBW's) "artifical" intervention. We would not want people to draw a parallel with Quicksilver, thinking it is intrinsically unstable and therefore relies on the FBW, because - in fact - Quicksilver has been designed to be intrinsically stable at all speeds.

Funnily enough, just the other day, I was hearing views on the term "fly-by-wire" from one of its greatest proponents, former test pilot John Farley. John was the chief test pilot on the Harrier, which is one of those aircraft that can really benefit from what advanced FBW technology can do, but John said he also dislikes the term "fly-by-wire" - for different reasons to me, but he dislikes the term nonetheless - believing that it is open to being misunderstood.

The way we describe Quicksilver's control system is simply to say it is "electronic". It is really no different to sending an e-mail instead of a letter. The computer doesn't actually write the letter, the person does! It's just that the method of transmission is electronic as opposed to manual.

There is only one set of circumstances in which the control system "takes over" from me, and that is in a dire emergency, when it shuts things down (such as the engine) and put things in a safe position (such as the rudders, water-brake and fuel shut-off valve) much quicker than any human could - and in the right sequence, with the optimum timing. It can also activate the on-board fire-extinguisher system, if need be, and the bouyancy bags - in both cases even if I am incapacitated.

I hope this goes part of the way to explaining things.

KW Mitchell
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Re: Quicksilver

Post by KW Mitchell » Tue Jan 19, 2010 8:51 pm

Thanks, Nigel, that's most illuminating.

As for your control systems it would seem obvious to me that you would adopt electronic methods but can I ask is there much use of fibre-optic cable communications as this would seem to be particularly suited to the conditions the craft operates in?

Also, I noted your comment about controlling fore-aft stability by designing a very forward CoG. Again, based on your illustration, the relatively small size of the sponsons in relation to the craft overall and the projected weight, how have you overcome possible forward buoyancy issues and problems arising from a reluctance to plane - somewhat K7-like before the cobbled-on tail-weight 'solution' -------?

Thankyou, in anticipation, for answering these queries; it does help us all to further our interest in the project.

Keith

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Renegadenemo
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Re: Quicksilver

Post by Renegadenemo » Wed Jan 20, 2010 1:36 am

Nigel, putting the design aside for a moment, and having spoken at length with Lorne Campbell myself, you're safe enough there, methinks. I have a more immediate question. What material are you using for the structure outboard of the frame and the outer skins? Given the choice I'd use aluminium as it's as easy to work as modelling clay and simple to mend / modify in the field but what is the plan?
I'm only a plumber from Cannock...

"As to reward, my profession is its own reward;" Sherlock Holmes.

'Sometimes you gotta be an S.O.B if you wanna make a dream reality' Mark Knopfler

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Re: Quicksilver

Post by quicksilver-wsr » Wed Jan 20, 2010 8:53 pm

Hello, Keith. Regarding your question about fibre-optic-based controls, the answer is that we have not gone that route - although "fly-by-light" would certainly be an interesting route to take.

One of our team members, Dr. John Challans, has considerable fibre-optic experience and expertise. However, in this particular case we are playing to the strengths of another team member, Simon Connell, who works with advanced jet-engine control and monitoring systems day in, day out.

Our priority is to supercede the current, manual (i.e. Bowden-cable-operated) throttle system with the electronic one. Then we will concentrate on finishing work already begun by Robert Atkinson on the electronic steering system, followed by the water-brake.

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