Technical Talk

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Renegadenemo
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Re: Technical Talk

Post by Renegadenemo » Thu Mar 29, 2018 12:04 am

Sorted the fittings on the water brake hoses then refilled, bled and pressurised the system but that only revealed that the actual problem was with the shuttle valve that sends oil to either the up or down side of the ram. It would extend but not retract because one of the solenoids that pushes a shuttle valve wasn't pushing hard enough resulting in an over-pressure event. Having made this discovery I dismantled the offending adjuster and promptly dropped a shower of tiny parts into an inaccessible corner of the hull. Much teamwork with a boroscope and magnets resulted in them all being retrieved after a long struggle so tomorrow I'll put it all back together again and attempt to get it working. The seat harness went in today and eight bolt fixings were drilled and Helicoiled into the front spar and that was it for the day. There's always some ill-informed moaner complaining that the boat is taking a long time to build. I so wish we could round them all up and make them stand in the workshop on days like today.
I'm only a plumber from Cannock...

"As to reward, my profession is its own reward;" Sherlock Holmes.

I have wrought my simple plan
If I give one hour of joy
To the boy who’s half a man,
Or the man who’s half a boy.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

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mtskull
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Re: Technical Talk

Post by mtskull » Thu Mar 29, 2018 8:11 am

[quote=Renegadenemo post_id=24163 time=1522278293 There's always some ill-informed moaner complaining that the boat is taking a long time to build. I so wish we could round them all up and make them stand in the workshop on days like today.
[/quote]
I saw just such a comment on your favourite social media site this morning.
Open question: If the presence of Bluebird is as vital to Coniston's local economy as some folk would have you believe, then how has any business managed to survive in the town since January 1967?
Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off your goals.

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Renegadenemo
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Re: Technical Talk

Post by Renegadenemo » Thu Mar 29, 2018 8:37 am

Open question: If the presence of Bluebird is as vital to Coniston's local economy as some folk would have you believe, then how has any business managed to survive in the town since January 1967?
Bluebird doesn't even need to be there to make a difference. It's such an inspiring and emotive subject our followers were buying into it when all we had was a corroded pile of bits. The possibilities are endless if properly managed yet another thing we hear from time to time is, why bother to run her? Why not just put her in the museum and shut the door?

Over my dead body!

Have to reassemble that damned valve today and see if it will adjust to throw the shuttle and let the brake travel properly. Assuming that goes well there's another eight fixings to drill and Helicoil in the spar (new BSF bolts arriving today) then the rest of the spar fixings can go in and we can start work on the nose, which is a mass of captive nuts and stiffeners. Hyd pump has to go on the engine and have its drains fitted, plumbing for the catch tanks might get started today if we're lucky too. Hey-ho - here we go again!
I'm only a plumber from Cannock...

"As to reward, my profession is its own reward;" Sherlock Holmes.

I have wrought my simple plan
If I give one hour of joy
To the boy who’s half a man,
Or the man who’s half a boy.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

Malcolm Ops
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Re: Technical Talk

Post by Malcolm Ops » Thu Mar 29, 2018 9:46 am

Major Engineering Projects.

Consider and compare the following:

A fully working steam locomotive, which had been 'owned' by the Nation for about two years, was found to be in need of a major overhaul (other words used were to be "complete refurbishment"). Why? Because the Museum involved wished to have "the locomotive steaming as a live museum exhibit". [The cost was budgeted to be £1.5m].

The work started in 2006 and was completed in early 2016. Just short of ten years. [The amount of money eventually spent was £4.2m, but it is the time we should be focusing on, the amount spent just shows how extensive the work became]. The locomotive has featured heavily in documentary programmes this year - it is of course the "Flying Scotsman".

The BBP may be 'delivering' a jet powered hydroplane as a live museum exhibit sometime around the end of 2019, from the starting point of a wreck that had been at the bottom of a lake for 34 years. Not to make light of the tragic accident which took a man's life, it was a damaged part hull with corroded power unit and many separate large and small pieces, most of which might be described as 'damaged goods'. [It also required re making of the many pieces recovered in 1967, which had become lost parts]. That jet powered hydroplane is Bluebird K7.

So how many years should the restoration work take .......... just as many as are needed to reach the goal of a proven live museum exhibit.
Malcolm Ops

Derby, England

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Renegadenemo
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Re: Technical Talk

Post by Renegadenemo » Thu Mar 29, 2018 10:22 am

Thanks, Malcolm... At least some folks understand what we're doing here.
Good news is the shuttle valve is now reassembled and working. Hyd system holds steady at 1500psi and the brake extends and retracts smoothly every time with two spare extension and retractions without the pump and an accumulator pressure of 400psi. Got a leak on the oil end of the accumulator but l'm on it.
I'm only a plumber from Cannock...

"As to reward, my profession is its own reward;" Sherlock Holmes.

I have wrought my simple plan
If I give one hour of joy
To the boy who’s half a man,
Or the man who’s half a boy.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

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Mike Bull
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Re: Technical Talk

Post by Mike Bull » Thu Mar 29, 2018 11:42 am

...and Bluebird will be more or less her original self, which isn't really something the 'Flying Scotsman' can claim...but that's another story! :lol:
'I am not what is called a "civilized man", Professor. I have done with society for reasons that seem good to me.'

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Renegadenemo
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Re: Technical Talk

Post by Renegadenemo » Fri Mar 30, 2018 12:55 am

Gremlin still not dead - the selector valve is still playing up and it's an electrical issue. Whether it's a failure or a wiring glitch will hopefully be revealed tomorrow when we try out a theory from our electrical wizards. This has now occupied us for three days but we would prefer the brake working and reliable for added safety. The leaky accumulator is probably a symptom too because the selector valve problem is causing an over-pressure event. Back at it soon as the sun comes up.
Front spar is now bolted in, though, so we have made some progress.
I'm only a plumber from Cannock...

"As to reward, my profession is its own reward;" Sherlock Holmes.

I have wrought my simple plan
If I give one hour of joy
To the boy who’s half a man,
Or the man who’s half a boy.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

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Canopener Al
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Re: Technical Talk

Post by Canopener Al » Fri Mar 30, 2018 3:00 am

Good luck with the Water Brake hyds Bill. The ruddy Jag undercarriage took me months to sort out! I just wish I had it in my back yard so I could sort it, not the ruddy 100 mile around trip once a week If I am lucky!

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Renegadenemo
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Re: Technical Talk

Post by Renegadenemo » Fri Mar 30, 2018 1:22 pm

Good luck with the Water Brake hyds Bill
Cheers... It;'s a ridiculously simple system too. A pump, one accumulator the size of a Thermos, a cut-in/cut-out damper and a selector valve.

Having stayed up all night (it seems) Checkie has offered a theory on the power supply to the selector that fits the symptoms bu testing it is a job that requires two and in the absence of any other willing Bluebirders today to press the water brake switch I'm off to the workshop with the star of the One Show - little Emily.

Will report in due course.
I'm only a plumber from Cannock...

"As to reward, my profession is its own reward;" Sherlock Holmes.

I have wrought my simple plan
If I give one hour of joy
To the boy who’s half a man,
Or the man who’s half a boy.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

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Renegadenemo
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Re: Technical Talk

Post by Renegadenemo » Fri Mar 30, 2018 3:15 pm

Got it - Checkie's diagnosis was bang on - two wires in the wrong pins in the supply to the selector valve meant that in one direction we had the single, relevant solenoid firing but in the other, both were energising causing a very unfortunate situation in the hydraulics.
The selector valve is designed to open one port to the supply pressure and another to the return side such that the ram extends and oil trapped in the retraction portion of the double acting ram can return freely to the tank - or vice versa. What was happening with both solenoids energised is that both sides of the ram were open to the supply pressure with the return port closed. This caused an over-pressure event in the circuit that first blew off a fitting at the rear, then pushed oil past the accumulator piston causing us to think it had failed as it's the repaired and modified original and we didn't know whether our modifications would work and assumed they hadn't, then it forced oil in a spurt past the gasket and the bolts at the top of the ram.

Ems and me went down today and swapped the wiring about then she sat in the cockpit and operated the switch so we could thoroughly test it. It's working perfectly now.
Ems in Cockpit.jpg
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I'm only a plumber from Cannock...

"As to reward, my profession is its own reward;" Sherlock Holmes.

I have wrought my simple plan
If I give one hour of joy
To the boy who’s half a man,
Or the man who’s half a boy.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

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